“I feel awful since I stopped smoking.”

A person said to me yesterday, “I feel awful since I stopped smoking.” This got me to thinking; life can be like that can’t it? Sometimes we don’t always feel good when we start taking care of our bodies.

And the reverse can be true as well- we sometimes feel good doing things that are not in our bodies’ best interests.

Why is this? Well simply said, our bodies adapt. Our bodies are designed to adapt. If you do something for a long enough period of time, your body will begin to work under these new conditions.

In effect, you can create a new normal for your body. After years of smoking cigarettes, your body incorporates the habit as “the new normal” whether it is healthy or not. Any deviation away from this habit will cause a stress response.

Like a child who has become accustomed to playing with a particular toy and has it suddenly taken away from them, the body may kick and scream as you start a new healthy habit- regardless if it is healthy or not. The simple fact that the body is in a state of TRANSITION means that things may feel unsettling to say the least.

I wish that we always felt good every time we started a new healthy habit, but that’s just not how the body works. Sometimes (i.e. almost always) TRANSITION is hard work and sometimes feels uncomfortable.

Tomorrow, I am starting a cleanse. If you see me and I am grumpy, tired, frustrated and on edge, please be patient with me: I’m in a state of transition.

-excusing myself from socially acceptable politeness over the next couple of days,

Dr. J

 

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Whole being.

We have a tendency to think of our bodies as parts. Eyes. Ears. Hands. Kidneys. Liver. Heart. This can be dangerous thinking. It limits our experience and may limit our health. A person who thinks in this manner may miss the benefits of well-researched holistic treatments. An allergic reaction to a certain food often displays itself as small bumps on the skin, but if you only focus on skin you may falsely just treat the skin and miss the greater problem of the food allergy. An ear infection is often the result of fluid not properly draining from the middle ear. This is a mechanical issue, and if you only look at the ear and prescribe antibiotics without addressing the poor fluid drainage, it may seem like enough (see my blog about ear infections). Anytime we limit our focus to think about the body as only parts and pieces, we do ourselves a disfavor and may be putting ourselves in harm’s way. We are more than the sum of our parts. Equally so, the more we learn about the human body, we discover the intricacies in which these cells, tissues, organs and systems interact.

Research has recently discovered the intimate relationship between the immune system and the  nervous system. This has spawned a new specialty of study within the medical profession called neuroimmunology. While being a new field for western medicine, chiropractic, acupuncture, homeopathy, naturopathy, and other holistic therapies have honored this relationship for many, many years. Chiropractors have postulated for a century that adjustments could help a person’s nervous system and thereby enhance a person’s immune system. Western medicine is just now beginning to understand and study this relationship. Ronald Pero, Ph.D., chief of cancer prevention research at New York’s Preventive Medicine Institute and professor of medicine at New York University, studied this theory.

He conducted a three year study of 107 subjects. In short, he studied the immune system of those under long term chiropractic care. He discovered  a 200% greater immune competence in those who were adjusted versus those people who had not received chiropractic care. He concluded, “Chiropractic may optimize whatever genetic abilities you have so that you can fully resist serious disease. I am very excited to see that without chemical intervention this group of patients under chiropractic care did show a very improved response.” (Pero R. “Medical Researcher Excited By CBSRF Project Results.” The Chiropractic Journal, August 1989; 32)

In 1991 Patricia Brennan, PhD conducted a study that demonstrated an increased immune function following a thoracic (mid back) adjustment. “Phagocytic respiratory burst of polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMN) and monocytes were enhanced in adults that had been adjusted by chiropractors.” This means that the immune system cells of the body that are responsible for eating up and killing foreign invading cells in the body are enhanced through chiropractic adjustments.

For more studies, please see the Research post.

Research is now validating what we already knew to be true: we are whole beings. Each cell does not act alone, each tissue does not act alone, and each system does not act alone. This is why a chiropractic adjustment can help an ear infection, an acupuncture needle can help with addiction, and crawling helps brain development.

Dr. Jerry

What does the research say?

I have heard chiropractic criticized for its lack of research on the the claim that chiropractic adjustments can help a person’s immune system guard against sickness. I understand this complaint and answer by saying that we are slowly responding to this call. Here is a small list of 110 research articles demonstrating the benefits of spinal adjustments and the immune system.
(Thank you to Dr. Christian Chatzoglou of Winnipeg, MB for putting this list together.)
Warmly,
Dr. Jerry Gould

Immunity References
1. Riley, G.W. Osteopathic Success in the Treatment of Influenza and Pneumonia. American Osteopathic Association – Chicago Session. July 1919. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 1919.
2. Riley, G.W. Osteopathic Success in the Treatment of Influenza and Pneumonia. American Osteopathic Association – Chicago Session. July 1919. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 1919. Special Reprint Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Vol. 100. No. 5, May 2000.
3. Noll, DR., Shores, JH., Gamber, RG. Benefits of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment for Hospitalized Elderly Patients with Pneumonia. Journal of the American Osteopathic Assocaition. Vol. 100. No. 12. December 2000.
4. Breithaupt, T., Harris, K., Ellis, J. Thoracic lymphatic pumping and the efficacy of influenza vaccination in healthy young and elderly populations. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Vol. 101. No. 1. January 2001.
5. Noll DR, Degenhardt BF, Stuart MK, Werden S, McGovern RJ, Johnson JC. The effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment on immune response to the influenza vaccine in nursing homes residents: a pilot study. Altern There Health Med. 2004 Jul-Aug;10(4):74-6.
6. Degenhardt BF, Kuchera ML. Update on osteopathic medical concepts and the lymphatic system. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):97-100.
7. Allen TW. Coming full circle: osteopathic manipulative treatment and immunity. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1998 Apr;98(4):204.
8. Schmidt IC. Osteopathic manipulative therapy as a primary factor in the management of upper, middle, and pararespiratory infections. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1982 Feb;81(6):382-8.
9. Ward, EA. Influenza and Its Osteopathic Management. Eastern Osteopathic Association’s Seventeenth Annual Convention. New York, April 3, 1937. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. Sept. 1937.
10. Ward, EA. Influenza and Its Osteopathic Management. Eastern Osteopathic Association’s Seventeenth Annual Convention. New York, April 3, 1937. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. Sept. 1937. Special Reprint. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. Vol. 100. No. 5. May 2000.
11. Smith, KR. One hundred thousand cases of influenza with a death rate of one-fortieth of that officially reported under conventional medical treatment. Annual Convention of the American Association of Clinical Research, New York. Oct. 18, 1919. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. January, 1920.
12. Smith, KR. One hundred thousand cases of influenza with a death rate of one-fortieth of that officially reported under conventional medical treatment. Annual Convention of the American Association of Clinical Research, New York. Oct. 18, 1919. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. January, 1920. Special Reprints. J. Am Osteopath Assoc. Vol. 100. No. 5. May 2000.
13. Patterson, M. Osteopathic methods and the great flu pandemic of 1917-1918. JAOA (The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association) May 2000; 100(5):309-10
14. Masarsky, C. 1918. Dynamic Chiropractic. November 17, 2003, Volume 21, Issue 24 http://www.chiroweb.com/archives/21/24/01.html
15. Kent, C. Chiropractic and infectious disease — an historical perspective. The Chiropractic Journal April 2003. http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/2003/apr/apr2003kent.htm
16. Harte, D. Alternative to the sting of a failed flu vaccine. The Chiropractic Journal. March 2004. http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/2004/mar/harte.htm
17. Kent, C. Neuroimmunology and chiropractic. The Chiropractic Journal. October 1995. http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/1995/oct/oct1995kent.htm
18. Lerche Davis, J. Flu Shot Scare Fuels Scams. WebMd 11/2/2004 http://dailynews.att.net/cgi-bin/health?e=pub&dt=041102&cat=women&st=women103746&src=webmd#
19. Lawrence, S. How to Dodge the Flu Without a Shot. Even without a flu shot, you can still do something to protect yourself. WebMd. October 22, 2004. http://my.webmd.com/content/article/95/103481.htm
20. Whelan et al: The effects of chiropractic manipulation on salivary cortisol levels. JMPT. 2002 (25)3
21. Takeda et al: Long term remission and alleviation of symptoms in allergy and Crohn’s disease patients following spinal adjustment for reduction of vertebral subluxations. JVSR Vol 4. # 4. 2002
23. Selano, Grostic et al: The effects of specific upper cervical adjustments on the CD4 counts of HIV positive patients. CRJ. Vol 3. # 1. 1994.
24. Brennan et al: Enhanced neutrophil respiratory burst as a biological marker for manipulation forces. JMPT Vol. 15 # 2 Feb. 1992.

26. Brennan PC, Kokjohn K, Kaltinger CJ, Lohr GE, Glendening C, Hondras MA, McGregor M, Triano JJ “Enhanced Phagocytic Cell Respiratory Burst Induced by Spinal Manipulation: Potential Role of Substance P” J Manipulative Physiol There 1991; 14(7): 399-407.
27. Tuchin PJ “The Effect of Chiropractic Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Salivary Cortisol Levels.” Australian Journal of Chiropractic and Osteopathy 2: 1998; pp. 86-92.
28. Vora GS, Bates HA “The Effects of Spinal Manipulation on the Immune System (A Preliminary Report)” The ACA Journal of Chiropractic 1980; 14: S103-105.
29. Masarsky CS, Weber M “Chiropractic and Lung Volumes – A Retrospective Study” ACA Journal of Chiropractic 1986; 20(9): 65-67.
30. Kessinger R “Changes in Pulmonary Function Associated with Upper Cervical Specific Chiropractic Care” J Vertebral Subluxation Res. 1997;1(3): 43-49.
31. Menon M, Plaugher G, Jansen R, Dhami MSI, Sutowski J “Effect of Thoracic Spinal Adjustment on Peripheral Airway Function in Normal Subjects – A Pilot Study” Conference Proceedings of the Chiropractic Centennial Foundation 1995; July 6-8: 244-245.
32. Masarsky CS, Weber M “Chiropractic and Lung Volumes – A Retrospective Study” ACA Journal of Chiropractic 1986; 20(9): 65-67.
33. Allen JM “The Effects of Chiropractic on the Immune System: A Review of Literature” Chiropractic Journal of Australia 1993; 23: 132-135.
34. Rhodes WR: “The Official History of Chiropractic in Texas.” Texas Chiropractic Association. Austin, TX. 1978.

35. “Chiropractic Statistics.” The Chiropractic Research and Review Service. Burton Shields Press. Indianapolis, IN. 1925.

36. Wells BF, Janse J: “Chiropractic Practice. Volume 1. Infectious Diseases.” National College of Chiropractic. Chicago, IL. 1942.

37. Kent C: “Neuroimmunology — an update.” The Chiropractic Journal. August, 2001. http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/2001/aug/aug2001kent.htm

38. Kent C: “The mental impulse-biochemical and immunologic aspects.” The Chiropractic Journal. February, 1999. http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/1999/feb/feb1999kent.htm

39. Elenkov IJ, Wilder RL, Chrousos GP, Vizi ES: “The sympathetic nerve-an integrative interface between the two supersystems: the brain and the immune system.” Pharmacol Rev 2000;52:295-638. http://pharmrev.aspetjournals.org/cgi/reprint/52/4/595.pdf

40. Brennan PC, et al. Immunologic correlates of reduced spinal mobility. Proceedings of the 1991 International Conference on Spinal Manipulation (FCER):118.

41. Todres-Masarsky M, Masarsky CS. The Somatovisceral Interface: Further Evidence. In Masarsky CS, Todres-Masarsky M (editors). Somatovisceral Aspects of Chiropractic: An Evidence-Based Approach, 2001, Churchill Livingstone, New York.

42. Korr IM: “Andrew Taylor Still memorial lecture: research and practice — a century later.” J Am Osteopath Assoc 1974 73:362.Murray DR, Irwin M, Reardon CA, et al: “Sympathetic and immune interactions during dynamic exercise. Mediation via a beta 2 – adrenergic-dependent mechanism.” Circulation 1992 86(1):203.

43. Felten DL, Felten SY, Bellinger DL, et al: “Noradrenergic sympathetic neural interactions with the immune system: structure and function.” Immunol Rev 1987 100:225.

44. Felten DL, Felten SY, Bellinger DL, Madden KS: “Fundamental aspects of neural-immune signaling.” Psychother Psychosom 1993 60(1):46.

45. Kolata G: “Nerve cells tied to immune system.” The New York Times May 13, 1993.

46. Hosoi J, Murphy GF, Egan CL et al: “Regulation of Langerhans cell function by nerves containing calcination gene-related peptide.” Nature 1993 363(6425):159.

47. Undem BJ: “Neural-immunologic interactions in asthma.” Hosp Pract (Off Ed) 1994 29(2):59.

48. Sternberg EM, Chrousos GP, Wilder RL, Gold PW: “The stress response and the regulation of inflammatory disease.” Ann Intern Med 1992 117(10):854.

49. Fricchoine GL, Stefano GB: “The stress response and autoimmunoregulation.” Adv Neuroimmunol 1994 4(1):13.

50. Ottaway CA, Husband AJ: “Central nervous system influences on lymphocyte migration.” Brain Behav Immun 1992 6(2):97.

51. Weihe E, Krekel J: “The neuroimmune connection in human tonsils.” Brain Behav Immun 1991 5(1):41.

52. Grossman Z, Heberman RB, Livnat S: “Neural modulation of immunity: conditioning phenomena and the adaptability of lymphoid cells.” Int J Neurosci 1992 64(1-4):275.

53. Fidelibus, J.; An overview of neuroimmunomodulation and a possible correlation with musculoskeletal system function JOURNAL OF MANIPULATIVE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS. 1989 Vol. 12 Pgs. 289-292

54. Davison, S.; Parkin-Smith, G.F.; The possible effect of cervical chiropractic manipulation on short-term lymphocytic response – a pilot study WFC’S 7TH BIENNIAL CONGRESS CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS, MAY 1-3, 2003. 2003 Vol. 7th Edt. Pgs. 278-80

55. Ali, S.; Hayek, R.; Holland, R.; Mckelvey, S.E.; Boyce, K.; EFFECT OF CHIROPRACTIC TREATMENT ON THE ENDOCRINE AND IMMUNE SYSTEM IN ASTHMATIC PATIENTS. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SPINAL MANIPULATION. 2002 OCT Vol. Pgs.

56. Pickar, J.G.; Kang, Y-M.; Kenney, M.J.; Inflammation of Lumbar Multifidus Muscle Reflexively Increases Sympathetic Nerve Activity to Spleen and Kidney THE JOURNAL OF CHIROPRACTIC EDUCATION. 2002 SPR Vol. 16(1) Pgs. 44-5

57. Davison, S.M.; Parkin-Smith, G.F.; Immunological profiles in asymptomatic subjects after chiropractic cervical spine manipulation PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORLD FEDERATION OF CHIROPRACTIC CONGRESS. 2001 MAY Vol. 6 Pgs. 264-5

58. Hoiriis, K.T.; Edenfield, D.; Chiropractic and The Immune Response: A Literature Review JOURNAL OF VERTEBRAL SUBLUXATION RESEARCH. 2000 OCT Vol. 4(1) Pgs.

59. Martin, C.; Chiropractic and HIV Infection JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHIROPRACTIC ASSOCIATION. 1995 DEC Vol. 32(12) Pgs. 41-4
60. Spector NH. Anatomic and Physiologic connections between the central nervous system and the immune systems. Reprinted. In: Research Forum 1987;103-17.
61. Besedovsky HO, Del Rey A. Physiological Implications of the Immune-Neuro-endocrine Network. Psychoneuroimmunology, Academic Press, Inc. Second Edition. 1991;589-603.
62. van Breda WM, van Breda JM. A comparative study of the health status of children raised under the health care models of chiropractic and allopathic medicine. J Chirop Res. 1989;5(4):101-103.
63. Rose-Aymon S, Aymon M, Prochaska-Moss G, Moss R, Rebne R, Nielsen K. The relationship between intensity of chiropractic care and the incidence of childhood diseases. J Chirop Res 1989;5(3):70-7 .
64. Reubi JC, Horisberger U, Kappeler A, Laissue JA. Localization of Receptors for Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Somatostatin, and Substance P in distinct compartments of human lymphoid organs. Blood 1998;92(1):191-197.
65. Giron LT, Crutcher KA, Davis JN. Lymph nodes-A possible site for sympathetic neuronal regulation of immune response. Annals of Neurology 1980;8(5):520-525.
66. Murray DR., Irwin M, Rearden CA, Ziegler M, Motulsky H, Maisel AS. Sympathetic and Immune Interactions During Dynamic Exercise Mediation Via a Beta2-Adrenergic-Dependent Mechanism. Circulation 1992; 86:203-213.
67. Brennan PC, Graham MA, Triano JJ, Hondras MA, Anderson RJ,. Lymphocyte profiles in patients with chronic low back pain enrolled in a clinical trial. J Manip Physiol There 1994 17(4): 219-227.
68. Lohr GE, O’Brien JC, Nodine DL, Brennan PC. Natural killer cells as an outcome of chiropractic treatment efficacy. In: Proceedings of the Internationa1 Conference on Spinal Manipulation. Arlington, Virginia: Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research 1990:109-12.
69. Injeyan, S. Studies on the effects of spinal manipulation on the immune response. Internet WWW 1999; http//www.c3r.org/research/injeyan-R/injeyan-r.html
70. Ottaway CA, Husband AJ. Central nervous system influences on Lymphocyte Migration. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 1992;6(2):97-116.
71. Neveu PJ, Le Moal M. Physiological basis for neuroimmunomodulation. Fundam Clin Pharmacol 1990;4:281-305.
72. Giron LT, Crutcher KA, Davis JN. Lymph nodes-A possible site for sympathetic neuronal regulation of immune response. Annals of Neurology 1980;8(5):520-525.
73. McCain HW, Lamster IB, Bozzone JM, Gribic JT. Beta-Endorphin modulates human immune activity via nonopiate receptor mechanisms. Life Science 1982;31:1619-24.
74. Payan DG, Brewster DR., Goetzl EJ. Specific Stimulation of Human Lymphocytes by Substance P. J. Immunol. 1983;131(4):1613-15.
75. Payan DG, Brewster DR, Missirian-Bastian A,Goetzl EJ. Substance P Recognition by a Subset of Human T Lymphocytes. J Clin Invest. 1984;74:1532-39.
76. Mertelsmann R,Welte K. Human Interleukin 2: molecular biology, physiology and clinical possibilities. Immunobiol.1986;172:400-19.
77. Badalamente MA, Dee R, Ghillani R, Chien P, Daniels K. Mechanical Stimulation of Dorsal Root Ganglia Induces Increased Production of Substance P:A Mechanism for Pain Following Nerve Root Compromise. Spine. 1987;12(6):552-5.
78. Lindholm D, Neumann R, Meyer M, Thoenen H. Interleukin-1 regulates synthesis of nerve growth factor in non-neuronal cells of rat sciatic nerve. Nature 1987;330:658-659.
79. Lindholm D, Neumann R, Hengerer B, Thoenen H. Interleukin-1 increases stability and transcription of mRNA encoding nerve growth factor in cultured rat fibroblasts. J. Biol. Chem. 1988;263:16348-16351.
80. Neveu PJ, Le Moal M. Physiological basis for neuroimmunomodulation. Fundam Clin Pharmacol 1990;4:281-305.
81. Besedovsky HO, Del Rey A. Physiological Implications of the Immune-Neuro-endocrine Network. Psychoneuroimmunology, Academic Press, Inc. Second Edition. 1991;589-603.
82. Brennan PC, Kokjohn K, Triano JJ, Fritz TE,Wardip CL, Hondras MA. Immunologic correlates of reduced spinal mobility: preliminary observations in a dog model. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Spinal Manipulation.Arlington, Virginia. Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research. 1991:118-21.
83. Roszman TL,Carlson SL. Neurotransmitters and Molecular signaling in the Immune Response. Psychoneuroimmunology, Second Edition. Academic Press, Inc 1991:311-33.
84. Murray DR., Irwin M, Rearden CA, Ziegler M, Motulsky H, Maisel AS. Sympathetic and Immune Interactions During Dynamic Exercise Mediation Via a Beta2-Adrenergic-Dependent Mechanism. Circulation 1992; 86:203-213.
85. Ottaway CA, Husband AJ. Central nervous system influences on Lymphocyte Migration. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 1992;6(2):97-116.
86. Wells MR, Racis SP, Vaidya U. Changes in Plasma Cytokines Associated with Peripheral Nerve Injury. J Neuroimmunol. 1992;39:261-8.
87. Felten DL, Felten SY, Bellinger DL, Madden KS. Fundamental Aspects of Neural-Immune Signaling. Psychother Psychosom 1993;60:46-56.
88. Bellinger DL, Lorton D, Brouxhon S, Felten S, Felten DL. The significance of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in immunomodulation. Adv Neuroimmunol 1996;6(1):5-27.
89. Herzberg U,Murtaugh MP, Carroll D, Beitz AJ. Spinal Cord NMDA Receptors Modulate Peripheral Immune Responses and Spinal Cord c-fos Expression after Immune Challenge in Rats Subjected to Unilateral Mononeuropathy. J Neurosci. 1996;16(2):730-43.
90. Reubi JC, Horisberger U, Kappeler A, Laissue JA. Localization of Receptors for Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Somatostatin, and Substance P in distinct compartments of human lymphoid organs. Blood 1998;92(1):191-197.
91. Alcorn SM. Chiropractic treatment and antibody levels. J Aust Chiropractors Assoc 1977. 11(3):18-37.
92. Vora G, Bates H. The effects of spinal manipulation on the immune system. Am Chiropr Assoc J Chiropr 1980; 4:S103-5
93. Luisetto G, Spano D, Steiner W. et al. Immunoreactive ACTH, beta-endorphin and calcitonin before and after manipulative treatment of patients with cervical arthrosis and Barre’s syndrome. In: Napolitano E., editor.Research in chiropractic: Proceedings of ICA International Congress. Washington, DC: International Chiropractor’s Association. 1983;47-52.
94. Richardson DL, Kappler R, Klatz R. et al.The effect of osteopathic manipulative treatment on endogenous opiate concentration (abstract) J AM Osteopath Assoc 1984;84:127.
95. Vernon HT, Dhami MSI, Howley TP, Annett R, Spinal Manipulation and Beta-Endorphin: A Controlled Study of the Effect of a Spinal Manipulation on Plasma Beta-Endorphin Levels in Normal Males. J Manip Physiol There. 1986;9(2):115-23
96. Christian GF, Stanton GJ, Sissons D, How HY, Jamison J, Alder B, Fullerton M, Funder JW. Immunoreative ACTH, Beta-endorphin and cortisol levels in plasma following spinal manipulative therapy. Spine 1988;13(12):1411-1417.
97. van Breda WM, van Breda JM. A comparative study of the health status of children raised under the health care models of chiropractic and allopathic medicine. J Chirop Res. 1989;5(4):101-103.
98. Rose-Aymon S, Aymon M, Prochaska-Moss G, Moss R, Rebne R, Nielsen K. The relationship between intensity of chiropractic care and the incidence of childhood diseases. J Chirop Res 1989;5(3):70-7 .
99. Kokjohn K, Kaltinger C, Lohr GE, et al. Plasma substance P following spinal manipulation. . In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Spinal Manipulation. Arlington,Virginia: Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research. 1990:105-8.
100. Lohr GE, O’Brien JC, Nodine DL, Brennan PC. Natural killer cells as an outcome of chiropractic treatment efficacy. In: Proceedings of the Internationa1 Conference on Spinal Manipulation. Arlington, Virginia: Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research 1990:109-12.
101. Brennan PC, Kokjohn K, Kaltinger CJ, Lohr GE, Glendening C, Hondras MA, McGregor M, Triano JJ. Enhanced phagocytic cell respiratory burst induced by spinal manipulation: Potential role of substance P. J Manip Physio Ther.1991;14(7):399-408.
102. McGregor M, Brennan P,Triano JJ. Immunologic response to manipulation of the lumbar spine. In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Spinal Manipulation. Arlington,Virginia: Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research 1991:153-5.
103. Brennan PC,Triano JJ,McGregor M, Kokjohn K, Hondras MA, Brennan PC. Enhanced neutrophil respiratory burst as a biological marker for manipulation forces: Duration of the effect and association with substance P and Tumor Necrosis Factor. J Manip Physiol There. 1992;15(2):83-9.
104. Brennan PC, Graham MA, Triano JJ, Hondras MA, Anderson RJ,. Lymphocyte profiles in patients with chronic low back pain enrolled in a clinical trial. J Manip Physiol There 1994 17(4): 219-227.
105. Injeyan, S. Studies on the effects of spinal manipulation on the immune response. Internet WWW 1999; http://www.c3r.org/stephen_injeyan.htm
106. Injeyan J, Ruegg, Injeyan S. Phenotypic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in normal subjects receiving SMT. International Conference on Spinal Manipulation. October, 2002.
107. Spector NH. Anatomic and Physiologic connections between the central nervous system and the immune systems. Reprinted in: Research Forum 1987;103-17.
108. Fidelibus JC.An overview of neuroimmunomodulation and a possible correlation with musculoskeletal system function. J Manip Physiol There 1989;12(4):289-292.
109. Allen, JM. The effects of chiropractic on the immune system: A review of the literature. Chiropractic Journal Aust 1993;23:132-5.
110. Kent, C. Neuroimmunology. International Chiropractic Pediatric Association. 1996. Internet. WWW.http://www.4icpa.org/research/psychone.htm

Three things you should know about whiplash injuries.

Whiplash is an injury to the neck that occurs from a rapid acceleration followed by a sudden deceleration force. These sudden forces can cause tearing of the soft tissues (ligaments and muscles) and damage to the  joints of the spine. This injury can occur from slips and falls but is most often associated with motor vehicle accidents.

1st: Symptoms may not occur until 24-72 hours after the accident. Unfortunately, it takes only 72 hours for an injury to become “chronic”. This is why whiplash injuries can be so problematic.  Once an injury becomes chronic it much more difficult to heal.  According to Dr George Langlitz, “some 45% (of whiplash patients) report they still suffer with symptoms two years later.” Having your spine evaluated after an accident is a good idea, even if at first you do not have any symptoms.

2nd Symptoms are not always as straightforward as having neck pain.

Symptoms may be as follows:

  • Difficulty with vision
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Neck pain
  • Pain between the shoulder blades
  • Shoulder pain
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Headache
  • Tingling or numbness in face, head, shoulders, arms, or hands
  • Jaw or face pain

3rd Chiropractic is a researched and proven therapy for whiplash patients. According to The British Journal of Orthopaedic Medicine (1999) 22(1):22-25, in a paper titled Chiropractic”Only Proven Effective Treatment” for Chronic Whiplash, researchers Khan et al concluded : “Our results confirm the efficacy of chiropractic, with 69 of our 93 patients (74%) improving following treatment.”

It is a good idea to see a chiropractor within 24 hours after experiencing an acceleration/deceleration accident.

Dr Jerry

 

 

Over the edge with wellness.

The word wellness is a hot topic. Everyone is talking about wellness these days. Hospitals and emergency trauma centers are even changing their names to titles like “Hospital-Wellness center” and “Family Wellness Center and Trauma” (honestly, you can Google “trauma and wellness” and find thousands of these names). Do these places now provide the product of wellness to people?

One hospital has recently put out an advertising campaign that has different patients describing their own unique definition of wellness- i.e. “wellness is being able to play with my granddaughter” or “wellness is a sunny day” or “wellness is not being sick anymore”. I like these definitions because they are personal definitions- unique to each individual. On the up side, the word wellness has catapulted people to become more involved in their health, more aware of their daily life choices and how those choices may impact their lives. Some people may have shifted away from the old paradigm of the disease-care model and into a more health-promoting way of thinking. This is quite a change; people are now participating in their health and looking at preventing problems rather than waiting for a doctor to cure their disease. “Wellness” has inspired some to be more invested in their health, more aware of their environment, and take more responsibility in their pursuit of happiness.  I am in full support of these changes. But to be honest, I don’t really like the word anymore. It doesn’t feel right to me. I feel like it has been used more as a marketing gimmick to promote a product’s image than as a helpful ideal for people to use towards greater well-being.

Wellness is difficult to define because it is difficult to measure.  Unlike disease, whereby we can use a microscope, some blood work, an MRI, and a biopsy to detect and analyze abnormalities of the body, wellness is defined as not just the absence of disease, but the optimal functioning of body, mind and spirit. My question is, how do you measure that? Disease can be measured as some variant from the normal (I can show someone an x-ray of what normal looks like and then another that has multiple levels of degeneration in their spine and say, “this is not how it should be”). It is much more difficult and quite vague to do an exam and declare, “You are less than wellness.” The ambiguity is why marketing people love the word and can use it to sell everything from dog food to underwear  (The Wellness Brief®). Herein lies my concern. Because there is no measure of wellness and it is marketed as something to provide a better and greater life experience, the search for greater health can become obsessive and equally elusive. The value of wellness gets lost in the act of trying to find wellness. It becomes a quest for wellness, a race for wellness, or a goal of wellness that has no end in sight. To me this seems rather strange. It has become a paradox: the obsession for wellness negates the possibility of finding it (my experience is that neurotic behavior is rather unwellness-like).

I used to like the word wellness, but now I’m too jaded in my belief that someone is just trying to sell me a product or services that cannot be measured and quantified in its value.  Simply put, I feel that the word has become overused and under defined.

Just a rant. I hope you are well.

Dr J

“Follow your bliss”- Joseph Campbell

Joseph Campbell was a professor of mythology and loved to study the human spirit. He said, “Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.”  This past week for me was very inspiring because I had the privilege of engaging with a number of people who appear to be following their BLISS“. You can identify these people because they have a certain glow and radiance about them. Life feels lighter when I am around these types of people and when I leave their presence I somehow feel more present to my own life. I am inspired (in-spirit). What I find most evident with these types of people is that they are so clearly comfortable in their own skin. They seem to know who they are and what they want. What I’ve also discovered is how deliciously diverse each Bliss can be. There are no two paths that are the same. We are all different beings with something different to offer to the world.

Last week, friends of ours visited with us on their way out of town. They had taken an old school bus and converted it to an RV. With three teenage children, they were taking to the open road with the sole purpose of experiencing life and learning from their adventures. The only plan that existed was to be back in New England in three months. There adventurous spirit, their creativity (the bus is one very cool fort with each kid having their own “room”) and their dedication to their values of family, learning and fun was infectious. They were clearly following their bliss. You can checkout their blog @ http://unschoolbus.com

Why do I talk about this on a chiropractic health blog? Because it inspires me. I think anything that inspires the spirit is just as much about health as is eating an apple, exercising, or getting adjusted. Someone a long time ago told me that the word “health” comes from a derivative of the word “whole”. To be healthy is to become whole. Discovering who we are and what we want is the process of becoming whole. Maybe this is also why I have taken to telling my patients that they do not “need” to be adjusted, but have the freedom to choose to be adjusted if they “want”. It is my experience that “need” is so rarely the place where one can discover their passions and follow their bliss.

If you read this blog, then I thank you and hope that it inspired you. But you don’t have to read it in order to inspire me. Writing it was my bliss.

Other Joseph Campbell quotes:

“Love is a friendship set to music.”

“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”

“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.”

-Dr Jerry

Balance

Sorry that I haven’t posted in a while. My attention has been divided elsewhere. I have recently created the office Facebook page and have started writing a biweekly column for Hamitlon-Wenham Patch. For someone who is not so technologically savvy and is constantly trying to find the balance of where to spend the limited resource of his emotional energy, these two additions into my life have been a transition to say the least. I invite you to check out either one of these websites.

Over the past few years I have discovered many great truths that have made an enormous impact on my life. One of those truths is the experience that time is a limited resource. Awareness of this truth puts one in a very powerful and precarious position of recognizing the depth of one’s choice. It has been my experience that how I choose to use my time can be the difference between feeling inspired and feeling overwhelmed. It is my experience that I feel more fulfilled and free to create when I am less obligated. Choosing what tasks to perform in a day is the great balancing act. I am a father, a friend, a spouse, a son, a healer, a student, a teacher, an athlete, and so much more. Nurturing anyone of these can be a full-time job. I’m still figuring it out.

Please bear with me as I continue down this experiential path that we call life. I’m enjoying the journey and learning a lot. I hope to post more on the wonderful topics of health and life. But, if you don’t get a post in a few months, then know I have rebounded the other way and have just decided to live out my life as the mystical Luddite that I am.

respectfully and thoughtfully,

Dr. Jerry